Netflix February 2017_day.25 – The God of Cookery (1996)

_I love the cold. Living in Vegas, we don’t get much of it, and in relation to plenty of other parts of the world, Vegas-cold is dick. I go “Brrrr 50 degrees brrrrrrrrrr” while there are people all over the rest of the country who have to do things like chisel ice off their car windows. That’s something I’ve literally never done in my entire life. But even once it gets down to freezing levels, you know, 32 degrees Fahrenheit like us silly Americans say, I love the cold. I treasure the short time I have with it. Sure, it kind of sucks when it’s just so it’s biting at my fingers, making it painful to touch things and trying to grip something feels like my entire arm is going to shatter from moving it in the bitter temperature, but I still love it. I actually smile while lying in bed, freezing my ass off, pulling all my covers over my body, huddling up as snugly as I can, trying to position my feet and hands in blanket pockets for warmth. That’s the thing I love…the feeling of not being cold in the cold. It beats the feeling of not being hot in the scorching heat a hundred times.

I think it’s because it’s far easier for the cold to actually kill you. The feeling of actively not dying in the cold is better than the feeling of being slightly less miserable in the heat.


This cocky chef once ruled the kitchen — before he didn’t. Now it’s time for the most delicious comeback ever tasted!”

I like food. The God of Cookery.

_The God of Cookery is a movie by Stephen Chow. He plays…Stephen Chow, which Wiki tells me uses different Chinese characters than his actual name but is still Stephen Chow, who is the titular God of Cookery. Except he’s a total crock and an arrogent piece of shit, he’s all show, and he’s taken down by his corrupt Triad business partner who has tired of him and concocts a scheme to publicly ruin him. So he gets ruined, but then starts his ascent back to superstardom and being the God of Cookery again!

_Asia is weird. Well, maybe not weird but…very different from the US. Obviously. But it’s more like…Stephen Chow makes these crazy ass absurdist martial arts/comedy hybrid movies and wins shit tons of awards in Hong Kong. Shaolin Soccer is about a group of Shaolin monks who play in a soccer tournament and play the evil team literally called Team Evil. Could you imagine a movie with a plot remotely resembling that being nominated for Oscars?

I wish the Oscars were like that.

_You know me: I love my Hong Kong martial arts movies. So therefore, Stephen Chow, who makes tons of movies lampooning and paying homage to the ridiculousness of them by basically making those kinds of movies only in different settings like “With chefs” or “With soccer” is totally up my alley.

_The ending of the movie reminded me of Ratatouille. To try to win back the title of God of Cookery, after the bad guys blow up his dish, Chow only has two minutes to plate a meal. So he makes barbecue pork rice aka SORROWFUL RICE. Such a simple dish, but it’s great. But also tinged with such sadness.

_I was going to write up stuff on Stephen Chow and slapstick elements found in his movies, then found out that there’s a term for it – Mo lei tau. It’s basically Hong Kong slapstick, built on the nonsensical and lots of wordplay which I don’t understand cause I only speak English and it’s all probably lost in translation so there’s probably just a ton of jokes in the movie that go over my head. ButStephen Chow is supposed to be the guy for mo lei tau. So…I’ll take…internet article’s words on it. And also the fact that I like Stephen Chow movies I’ve seen, I’ll take my own word for it too. Though I haven’t really seen much of any other mo lei tau, so calling him the best is a kind of “By default” thing. Maybe I’ll have to look into some other stuff sometime.


_Stop by tomorrow, where I’ll be watching a drama because I was looking at the movies I had, and noticed it was full of comedies. Changeling. See you then~

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